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Daily skin care tips on Skin Cancer
Daily Skin Care Tips
 

Care Tips: Skin Cancer

Check for basal cell carcinomas
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, and it is most prevalent on the head or neck in people 40 years of age or older. Skin type and sun exposure levels are some of the primary contributing factors.
Early skin cancer detection
It is estimated that 1 in 5 individuals will develop skin cancer in their life. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer, as well as being the most prevalent form of cancer. BCCs first begin in the lower layer of the epidermis (in the basal cells).
Reduce skin cancer risk
Skin cancer usually develops in the outermost layer of skin (epidermis), consequently most tumors are easily detectable, even at the early stages.
The deadly risk associated with indoor tanning
A new study published in the December 1, 2008 issue of CANCER (a journal of the American Cancer Society) cites that more than 1.3 million skin cancer diagnoses occurs each year in the U.S.
AKs: What to look for
An actinic keratosis is a rough, scaly or crusty bump that forms on the surface of the skin. They are also called solar keratosis, sun spots, or precancerous spots. Dermatologists frequently refer to them as "AK's".
What are the differences between freckles and moles?
Freckles and moles are areas of increased pigment (melanin) in the skin, but they're not the same thing. Melanin is a natural substance that gives colour to hair, skin, and the iris of the eye, and it serves to protect the skin against UV radiation.
Regular skin checks can save lives!
According to Health Canada, skin cancer has been increasing in this country at a fairly constant rate over the past 30 years. In 2005, there were roughly 78,000 new cases of basal and squamous cell carcinomas reported, and about 4,400 new cases of malignant melanomas.
Take a closer look for AKs
Actinic keratoses (AKs) are skin lesions that are caused by the sun; they occur mainly on body areas that have been frequently exposed to sunlight. These growths are most commonly found on the face, hands, forearms and V of the neck, and are more prevalent among pale-skinned, fair-haired, light-eyed individuals. Actinic keratoses are considered to be pre-cancerous lesions, which mean they may become skin cancers. Any raised, reddish, rough-textured growth should be examined by a dermatologist. Remember that sun protection at any age is essential for preventing premature aging and reducing the risk of skin cancer. Even during the winter months, the daily application of an SPF15+ sunscreen, or a moisturizer containing sun protection, is highly recommended.
Skin cancer risk factors ...
You are at higher risk for developing skin cancer if you live in a sunny environment year-round, have experienced many bad sunburns, are fair-skinned, have an abundance of moles or freckles, or if you have a family history of skin cancer.
Did you know that most skin cancers are curable?
When detected early, most skin cancers are curable. In fact, non-melanoma skin cancers (like basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas) can be successfully treated in over 99% of cases if they are promptly diagnosed. Both natural (sun exposure) and artificial (sunbeds) sources of UV radiation can cause skin cancer.
Know your A-B-C-D-Es of skin cancer ...
Atypical moles are: Asymmetrical, with an uneven shape; have irregular Borders; are usually dark brown or black in Colour; have a Diameter the size of a pencil eraser (although it is best to find a melanoma before it has grown to this size); and are Evolving or changing.
The truth about sunbeds ...
For those of you using indoor tanning beds, beware that artificial sunlight can be as damaging to your skin and eyes as the real thing. In fact, artificial UV rays from tanning beds and sunlamps can be as much as 20 times stronger than natural sunlight.
Do regular skin checks!
According to Health Canada, skin cancer has been increasing in this country at a fairly constant rate over the past 30 years. In 2005, there were roughly 78,000 new cases of basal and squamous cell carcinomas reported, and about 4,400 new cases of malignant melanomas.